Tag Archives: Logan

The Best Bits: 2017 feat. Bee

Here it is: the best of the best from 2017. The list of albums is comprised of music from every genre. If you want to see the purely metal/rock top 10, you can find it on Metal Insider (spoiler: it’s not that different).

I also did things a little differently for the best films of 2017. My wife and I watched 26 new movies last year, so I decided why not reflect on all of them together? You’ll find our thoughts, both good and bad, on all those movies as well as our individual top 5 films of the year. Hope you enjoy.

Top 10 Albums of 2017:

1. Mutoid Man, War Moans (Sargent House)

mutoid man 

There was a lot of good music this year, but nothing stuck with me quite like Mutoid Man’s second album. It’s fast, catchy, and the most fun I’ve had with an album in a long time. Every track is a winner, especially the slower, sobering finale “Bandages”.

 

2. Steven Wilson, To the Bone (Caroline)

steven wilson 

I’m a Steven Wilson fanboy through and through, but album after album he’s proven there’s a reason for that. I wasn’t sure how To The Bone was going to match up to 2015’s sublime Hand. Cannot. Erase., but it’s another winner in Wilson’s stellar discography.

 

3. Trivium, The Sin and the Sentence (Roadrunner)

 trivium

I’m a long-time Trivium fan, but I’d be lying if I said I loved their more recent releases. That said, The Sin and the Sentence is everything that I ever loved about Trivium in the first place. High school Matthew would be very happy with this album.

 

4. Elder, Reflections of a Floating World (Stickman)

elder 

I tried to get into Elder a few years ago, and it didn’t take. But the strange sonic journey that is Reflection of a Floating World has me ready to take a dive into the band’s back catalogue.

 

5. Ghost Bath, Starmourner (Nuclear Blast)

ghost bath 

Moonlover was my favorite album of 2015 and has since become one of my favorite albums of all time. I wasn’t sure Starmourner was going to be a worthy followup. I’m glad I was wrong.

 

6. Ne Oblvisicaris, Urn (Season of Mist)

ne obliviscaris 

Ne Obliviscaris’s first two albums were good, but they didn’t grab me with such immediacy as Urn. I let the album repeat as soon as it was over.

 

7. Leprous, Malina (InsideOut)

Leprous-Malina

Leprous continue to release meticulously crafted music. Einar Solberg is proof that someone in metal does have the voice of an angel.

 

8. Astralia, Solstice (Aloud Music)

astralia

I discovered Astralia last year while looking for instrumental post-rock music that I could work to. Their new album is a soundscape of soothing atmospherical tracks that can take you places if you let it. “Farewell and Encounter” features a spoken word passage that makes the album that much more gorgeous.

 

 

9. Bell Witch, Mirror Reaper (Profound Lore)

bell witch 

This 83 minute single track album is the most moving piece of music I’ve listened to this year. It’s not for the impatient or faint of heart, but it is one hell of a journey.

 

 

 10. Iron & Wine, Beast Epic (Sub Pop)

iron and wine

Sam Beam has crafted another winner with Beast Epic. It’s a perfect melding of all the different sounds that Beam has weaved together on previous releases, from the upbeat poppier tracks to the contemplative acoustic passages.

 

Honorable Mentions:

Anathema, The Optimist (Kscope)
TWRP, Ladyworld (Self-Released)
Converge, The Dusk in Us (Epitaph/Deathwish)

 

Thoughts on 26 Films from 2017:

1. Fifty Shades Darker

Matt: It’s just like its predecessor: decent cinematography and soundtrack, but boring and sexless. The best thing I can say about it is that there’s only one more to suffer through.

Bee: Better than the first one, but only barely. Still holding out for them to adapt The Boss series.

 

2. Get Out

Matt: I feel like horror films are better now than they’ve ever been, and Get Out is proof of that. Take a bit of Rosemary’s Baby and mix it with Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner and you get one of the most important films of the year ripe with tension as the mystery unfolds.

Bee: Horror movies have always been well posed for weaving in social commentary. Get Out is nothing anyone would call subtle, but the humor and skill keep it from being too ham-fisted. Instant classic, and one I have already rewatched.

 

3. Logan

Matt: Logan marks the end of an era in bittersweet but awe-inspiring fashion. Hugh Jackman and Patrick Stewart both showed up with some of the best acting of their careers and newcomer Dafne Keene has a bright future ahead of her. This was without a doubt my favorite superhero film of the year.

Bee: I’m going to be honest, I didn’t find the plot to be anything special, but that’s excusable because the acting in this film is nothing short of genius. Stewart is fantastic and heartwrenching as always, Jackman will make you weep for all the watered down Wolverine movies of the past, and Keene delivers nothing less than a jaw-dropping debut.

 

4. Kong: Skull Island

Matt: A campy, ridiculous, 70’s tinged monster flick might not offer much we haven’t seen before, but it’s a whole lot of fun. If watching Kong smashing monsters in the face with a tree trunk turned baseball bat isn’t enough for you, John C. Reilly and Samuel L. Jackson should keep you entertained.

Bee: This was one of those odd movies that I walked out of the theatre loving, but the more I thought about it the more issues I had with it. It wastes its strong talent, offers little to no character development, and is utterly predictable. That being said, it’s gorgeous, and has a giant gorilla fighting…skeleton lizards? If you liked Pacific Rim you’ll likely enjoy this.

 

5. Beauty and the Beast

Matt: I can’t say that any of the Disney live-action remakes have blown me away, but they’re certainly very well crafted. Beauty in the Beast is much the same with new workings of its memorable score and an admittedly impressive rendition of the original film’s famous ballroom scene.

Bee: A perfectly passable re-envisioning of a classic. The CGI was a little over the top for my tastes, but I have a rather biased love for practical effects. Worth a watch, but in no way touches the original. Except Luke Evans, he can stay.

 

6. The Circle

Bee: The first half of the movie does a great job of setting the stage for an eerie dystopia run by Google, but ultimately fails to provide satisfying follow-through or conclusion to the themes it introduces.

Matt: The movie has a great cast and teases a decent build up, but it all ends up feeling far too on the nose. It all kind of ends with a shrug rather than a poignant statement on technology in the world today.

7. King Arthur: Legend of the Sword

Bee: BOY do they play fast and loose with a lot of the mythology here, but I’ll be damned if I didn’t enjoy every moment of this movie. Good world-building, great cast, beautiful sets, stellar soundtrack, and Charlie Hunnam is just fantastic.

Matt: This is not a film for Arthurian purists, but it is a solid action adventure film. Its stylish action set pieces and anachronistic tone provide enough entertainment that any moments of head scratching over the plot can be overlooked.

 

8. Alien: Covenant

Bee: Better than Prometheus. Fassbender continues to be the strongest part of this reboot. I’m hesitant to see how the series will unfold, but for now I’m still invested.

Matt: Ridley Scott proves once again that he knows how to shoot horror and how to make a movie look damn good. It’s not a particularly inspired entry; an Alien movie can only go so many ways. Still, Fassbender holds it all together with his dual performance, so it’s worth showing up for him if nothing else.

 

9. Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales

Bee: Better than I expected. Watch this movie for the music, stunning visual effects, and ship battles versus plot and character development and you’ll have a good time.

Matt: It’s not an amazing film and it’s not as good as the first three (never saw the fourth), but it’s not bad. The Pirates movies certainly know how to deliver unique action set pieces, and this one’s full of them.

 

10. Wonder Woman

Bee: A true beacon for the genre. This movie, more so than any superhero film to date, left me feeling hopeful and inspired. Gal Gadot has proved all of my initial concerns wrong at every turn and I couldn’t be happier.

Matt: It’s been long overdue, but a Wonder Woman film is finally here and it delivers on every level. The “No Man’s Land” scene will go down as one of the most iconic superhero movie moments in history, not least of all because it represents what we all want from a hero like Diana: hope in the face of overwhelming odds and the resilience to overcome them.

 

11. The Big Sick

Matt: A genuinely hilarious romantic comedy that manages to touch on many different subjects surrounding family, race, and cultural expectations. Kumail Nanjiani is brilliant and delivers a warm balance of laughs as well as heart.

Bee: Heartfelt, hilarious, and honest; this is my kind of comedy. A romantic comedy that is actually grounded in reality, and for all its dramatics feels genuinely relatable. I can only hope that the success of this film leads to more of this kind in the future.

 

12. Baby Driver

Matt: The best action film of the year bar none. Director Edgar Wright has another winner in his already stellar filmography. Featuring slick editing, a killer soundtrack, and some of the best car stunts you’ll ever see, Baby Driver is high-octane action at its finest.

Bee: A classic example of the plot summary is not doing the movie justice. More character driven than a heist movie, more emotionally grounded than a car chase movie, more glued-to-your-seat than a drama, this movie hits it out of the park any way you look at it. My pick for best of 2017.

 

13. Spider-Man: Homecoming

Matt: Spider-Man’s in the MCU, and while the idea of rebooting the character again after five years may give cause for eye-rolling, don’t be fooled. This is a light-hearted and funny superhero film that captures what Peter Parker and Spidey are all about. Plus, Michael Keaton absolutely steals the show as the villain Vulture.

Bee: As a card carrying member of the Toby Maguire is the best Spiderman club, this wasn’t half bad. Holland more than carries the physical requirements of the role and, while his Spidey currently lacks some of the characteristic snark, it’s a refreshing take on the role. A fresh take on both Aunt May and MJ were welcome shake-ups, and Keaton’s Vulture is one of the most engaging Marvel villains in recent memory.

 

14. War for the Planet of the Apes

Bee: Not my personal favorite out of the three, but an ultimately satisfying and well orchestrated conclusion to a truly magnificent trilogy. If you are at all a fan of visual effects, these movies are a must.

Matt: The conclusion to the Apes reboot trilogy manages to sidestep the “underwhelming third movie” curse. The mo-cap performances, led by Andy Serkis, are as captivating as ever and Matt Reeves’s direction is masterful.

 

15. Dunkirk

Matt: Christopher Nolan delivers yet another winner in this trim, tense World War II film. The driving focus on survival keeps you locked in from the get-go and even though the film’s subject involves defeat it doesn’t miss the chance to feel inspired by the time the credits roll.

Bee: Now I’m certainly not what anyone would call a Nolan fan-boy but the man knows how to tell a story. In an age where violence and shock value are used as selling points, he proves you don’t need copious amounts of blood to tell a gripping war story. Tense, well-paced, with just the right balance of emotion, I’ll have to admit Nolan earned his praise for this one.

 

16. Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets

Matt: The plot of the film doesn’t offer up anything spectacular, but the prologue and opening chase sequence are some of the best and most entertaining use of special effects I’ve seen this year.

Bee: Bland plot but goodness this movie is pretty and fun. Great special effects, gloriously extravagant chase scenes, and Rihanna as a morphing space blob burlesque dancer. What’s not to love?  

 

17. The Dark Tower

Bee: Out of all the Dark Tower installments “The Gunslinger,” which provides most of the material for this movie, should have been the easiest to adapt. Instead it’s a hard-to-follow mess which unacceptably alters the core of its main characters. Just read the book.

Matt: I’ve waited a long time for this film. While it’s great seeing Idris Elba and Matthew McConaughey bring two of Stephen King’s most famous characters to life, The Dark Tower is a drab, soulless action film. If they try adapting this again, I hope lessons will be learned.

 

18. Logan Lucky

Matt: I can’t tell you how much this movie surprised me in all right ways. It steeps itself in southern culture, particularly NASCAR, but leans on smart writing and intriguing characters rather than relying on the overdone self-parody we’re so used to seeing. Plus, Daniel Craig steals the show with one of his best roles yet.

Bee: I never would have expected a comedy-heist movie centered on blue collar Southerners and NASCAR to be one of my top movies of the year but here we are. Surprisingly subtle acting paired with a tight plot and genuinely interesting characters make for a refreshing and enjoyable view.

 

19. It

Matt: It is a better horror film than it is an adaptation; it’s a great fun to watch, but some changes were made that left me scratching my head. Still, the kids are all great and the camaraderie built between them is well depicted. This is probably the best you could do when adapting a book as long and as detailed as It.

Bee: Much more a coming of age film and much less a horror film, but not in a bad way. The kids are all fantastic, Bill Skarsgard is horrifyingly mesmerizing as Pennywise, and I can’t wait for the second installment. Fans of Stranger Things would love this.

 

20. American Assassin

Bee: Whether you’re watching it for the explosions and gunfire, Dylan O’Brien’s forearms, or for Michael Keaton being, well, Michael Keaton, you’ll have a good time. Ultimately forgettable, but an enjoyable watch.

Matt: This is one of those action movies you’ll flip to while watching TV and leave there because nothing else is on. It’s not bad, but it doesn’t bring anything new to the table. Michael Keaton is great fun and the action itself is done well enough to keep you watching.

 

21. Blade Runner 2049

Bee: It was long, it was slow, and I’m still not sure how I feel about the ending, but I would watch it again which is a large improvement from the first movie.

Matt: Watching this film is what I wanted to feel like watching the original Blade Runner. Beautiful cinematography and a palpable atmosphere weave in and around this film, spearheaded by a stellar Ryan Gosling, and delivers a sci-fi epic that may be long, but makes for quite the experience.

 

22. Thor: Ragnarok

Bee: Passably enjoyable, but I ultimately don’t feel that it offers much to the franchise. Cate Blanchett is laughable as one of the most cardboard cutout villains in the MCU. The Hulk is reduced to a comedic sidekick. Wake me up when Black Panther opens.

Matt: Definitely the best of the three Thor films. Thor finally gets to be the star of his own movie (as opposed to Loki) and while upping the comedy might not jive well with some, I enjoyed the many laughs mixed in with the crazy effects driven action.

 

23. Murder On The Orient Express

Bee: A fantastically over the top murder mystery that left me guessing until the end. Kenneth Branagh is lavishly flamboyant as always, and it was a treat.

Matt: Well filmed, well cast, and serves as a great reintroduction of Agatha Christie’s famous detective. Here’s hoping we get more movies with Kenneth Branagh and his killer moustache.

 

24. Justice League

Bee: Worth seeing just to watch Diana unapologetically roast Bruce. Ezra Miller is utterly brilliant as The Flash. The movie is a mess, but the characters and cast are solid, and I’m tentatively looking forward to more.

Matt: The mix of Zack Snyder’s and Joss Whendon’s two styles doesn’t really work and Superman’s return isn’t as triumphant as it should’ve been, but the film is fun all the same. Seeing these six heroes on screen together still made me giddy.

 

25. The Shape of Water

Bee: Pure beauty. This will not be most people’s cup of tea, but every single thing about this movie is artfully done. Guillermo continues to create some of the most unique and moving stories of his time, and watching Doug Jones continues to be a thing of magic. Not an Abe Sapien origin story. Sorry.

Matt: A wonderfully mature fairy tale bound together by a touching romance between a mute woman (Sally Hawkins) and a fishman (Doug Jones). This is Guillermo Del Toro at his finest.

26. Star Wars Episode VIII: The Last Jedi

Matt: Rian Johnson delivers a watershed film for the Star Wars saga. It does everything a sequel to The Force Awakens needed to do and the constant subverting of expectations offers brilliant results. Mark Hamill delivers his best performance yet and Carrie Fisher’s final performance makes the viewing that much more emotional.

Bee: Everything the middle child of a trilogy should be and then some. Perfect balance of bittersweet victories, satisfying character arcs, and the best lightsaber fight scene since Episode I. Grab a snack because it’s a long one, but trust me, you won’t mind one bit.
Top 5 Films of 2017:

Matt:
1. Logan
2. Star Wars Episode VIII: The Last Jedi
3. Dunkirk
4. Baby Driver
5. The Shape of Water

Bee:
1. Baby Driver
2. Wonder Woman
3. The Shape of Water
4. Logan
5. Logan Lucky

 

Favorite TV Show:

Godless

godless

This limited-series on Netflix is a violent and gritty western, but it’s the great acting and characters that kept me hooked. A tense build-up and a satisfying conclusion makes for one of the best westerns I’ve seen in a long time.

 

Favorite Book:

It by Stephen King

It_cover

So I’m a few years late on this one. The sheer depth and detail King invests in his characters and the town of Derry, Maine makes for an unforgettable experience and one that was hard to leave behind.

 

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The Good Bits: March 2017

Big month for pretty much everything from film to video game to music.

Music:

Mastodon, Emperor of Sand (Reprise)

Emperor_of_sand_cover

At this time of writing, I have only listened to Mastodon’s newest LP one time through. I thought I would need multiple listens in order to really settle on an opinion before writing, as was the case with 2014’s Once More Round the Sun. But about four tracks in I was pretty much sold: Mastodon have done it yet again. It’s been fifteen years since the band’s first album, and with the addition of their seventh they’re still sporting one of the most solid discographies in the metal scene.

Originally, there were reports that Emperor of Sand might be similar to Crack the Skye, my favorite Mastodon album But as it turns out, it’s only like Crack the Skye in concept, regarding themes of death and loss. And that’s fine, because Emperor of Sand delivers on its own merits with a sound structurally similar to its predecessor and The Hunter. “Show Yourself” is probably the poppiest the band has ever sounded, but that’s not a bad thing. The band have a great penchant for catchy lyrics and vibrant guitar riffs that keep the album moving at a steady pace while still feeling very much like Mastodon. Other tracks like the opener “Sultan’s Curse” will sound familiar, but it’s the closer “Jaguar God” that really nails it in my opinion, seemingly drawing from all corners of Mastodon’s discography. Overall, the album feels fresh and welcoming to newcomers. For long time fans like myself, it fits like a glove.

 

Me and That Man, Songs of Love and Death (Cooking Vinyl)

Me and That Man

I can’t say that I’ve listened to all that much of Tom Waits, Leonard Cohen, or Johnny Cash. I’ve enjoyed their music before and I recognize their impact, but I haven’t really explored much of that side of music yet. That said, I am totally into Me And That Man, a new project from Behemoth frontman Adam “Nergal” Darski and John Porter steeped in country, folk, and blues comparative to the artists mentioned above. While sonically a far cry from the blackened death metal of Behemoth, the lyrical content on Songs of Love and Death still bears similarities to Nergal’s main band especially on tracks like the opener “My Church is Black”, so if you’re not normally a fan of this type of genre but you love Behemoth or similar bands, this will still feel familiar to you. If, on the other hand, you’re not a big metal fan but you do enjoy the likes of the aforementioned artists, Me and That Man may still find an audience with you as their songs are dark, troubled, but not necessarily hard on the ears.

 

Pillorian, Obsidian Arc (Eisenwald)

pillorian

2016 saw the end of one of my favorite bands: Agalloch. Their brand of atmospheric black/folk metal was unlike anything else I’d ever heard and despite my attempts to find similar bands, none of them sounded quite like these guys. So you can imagine how excited I was to hear that the ex-members would continue to make music in different projects. The first project to emerge from the ashes is Pillorian, formed by Agalloch’s former frontman John Haughm. While Obsidian Arc leans a bit more towards straightforward black metal, there are still folk elements weaved into the music that are reminiscent of Agalloch without sounding derivative. The album is kept to a tight seven tracks with all but one ranging five to nine minutes in length. The final track, “Dark is the River of Man”, is my favorite, a dark melancholic track running at nine and a half minutes that perfectly ties the whole album together. If you’re still pining for Agalloch, you best give this a listen.

 

Film:

Logan

Logan_2017_poster

Seventeen years. How privileged are we that the actor who brought one of the most iconic comic book characters to life has been able to inhabit the role for nearly two decades while similar franchises sifted through sequels and reboots (three different actors have played Spider-Man!). And now it would appear that an era has come to a close, and it has done so in spectacular fashion. Logan is my favorite film so far this year, presenting Jackman’s swansong as a brutal emotional western that transcends the genre in such a way comparable to The Dark Knight.

While Logan is the third Wolverine solo movie and the tenth X-Men film overall, you can jump into the film with minimal prior viewing. So long as you know a bit about Wolverine and Professor X and have basic understanding of mutants, the film won’t lose you with the exception of a few smaller references. While I do enjoy the MCU films, I applaud this move as it allows more people to experience the film without having to lean on five or six films worth of world-building. Also, we finally get the R-rated Wolverine film we deserve, with all the blood, gore, and f-bombs you could want this side of Deadpool. But this movie doesn’t rely on its bloody action alone; Logan goes much deeper to the point where we genuinely worry about our heroes during the action scenes rather than just absorbing the spectacle.

Going in, you already know that Hugh Jackman and Patrick Stewart are going to deliver great performances, so I won’t say much on that point other than Jackman’s performance moved me to tears. Boyd Holbrook has a charismatic turn as the main villain and I’m sure he’ll be snatching up even bigger roles soon. But the big scene-stealer is Dafne Keen as Laura/X-23, who doesn’t even really speak until more than two-thirds of the way into the film. A mostly silent role can be difficult for the most experienced actor, but Keen absolutely delivers on that front and every other. I sincerely hope we see more of her soon and far into the future.

If you’re reading this, I’m sure you’ve seen Logan by now, but if by chance you haven’t, get out and go while it’s still in theaters.

 

Kong: Skull Island 

kong

After a twelve year absence from the big screen, King Kong has returned, mixing the likes of Jurassic Park with Pacific Rim to make a borderline B-movie with a bumpy tone that will get slightly poignant right before something ridiculous happens. In other words, Kong: Skull Island is big dumb fun. It has all the makings of a summer blockbuster apart from the fact that it was released in March, probably to avoid releasing close to War for the Planet of the Apes. I’ve spoken to a few people who rolled their eyes at the idea of a new King Kong movie, claiming that it’s yet another example of Hollywood digging into the ol’ barrel rather than pursuing something new. While that’s a sentiment I sympathize with, Kong doesn’t feel like a careless rehash; it feels fun and delivers an action-adventure monster film with classic tropes.

Kong doesn’t just mark the return of the titular ape. It’s also the second entry in Legendary Picture’s MonsterVerse, which began with 2014’s Godzilla that I reviewed a few months back. This film differs from Godzilla in many ways from pacing to tone, but the most noted difference is how Kong seemingly addresses its predecessor’s two biggest critiques: 1) that the human characters were boring, and 2) that Godzilla has a pretty small amount of screen time in his own movie. Now, I was a fan of Godzilla, but Kong does get bigger ups in terms of its cast. There’s a lot of great people in here: John Goodman, who drags everyone to this expedition; Samuel L. Jackson, a general stung by the United States’ loss in the Vietnam war; Brie Larson, a Vietnam war photographer who spends most of the film running around with a camera and yet still comes across as a competent character. Leading man Tom Hiddleston, a tracker and former Captain, is dashing and likable, but feels a bit downplayed in this role, lacking in background and personality compared to the other characters. John C. Reilly, on the other hand, is probably the most enjoyable character in the film as a pilot who was stranded on Skull Island during World War II.

And then there’s the big guy himself. Kong spends most of his time beating the living shit out of other monsters (and sometimes humans), though he does get the requisite humanizing scenes with Brie Larson’s character. It’s not played up quite as much as we normally see in other iterations, which is actually refreshing. We know Kong has a weak spot for the ladies and we don’t need it beaten over our heads again. Instead, the film allows a moment or two for a knowing nod to the history of Kong’s character, then lets him get back to crushing things. It’s awesome. The film takes full advantage of the time period too, soaking it in the Vietnam aesthetic with great visuals and a soundtrack full of classic 60’s/early 70’s tunes.

So, no, this isn’t just another rehash and you certainly don’t need to see Godzilla or even care about the MonsterVerse in order to enjoy Kong: Skull Island.

 

John Wick 

john-wick-poster1

Here’s another for one the “movies-I-slept-on-that-are-great” list. I didn’t think much about John Wick when I first heard about it, but then, of course, everyone whirled around to tell me “WTF GO WATCH IT.” And, lo and behold, John Wick is a genuinely great action flick. Apart from the film’s impressive stunts, style, and direction, one of the best parts of the film for me personally was the implication of a larger underground world of assassin’s that Keanu Reeve’s titular character belongs to. It’s never really explained and by the end of the film there are more questions than answers, but it’s so fascinating that I’m actually glad there isn’t really any exposition. The workings of the world are merely implied by the character’s actions and left to open interpretation. I’m sure I’ll get more insight when I finally get to sit down and watch John Wick 2.

 

Books:

Dune Messiah by Frank Herbert

dune-messiah

Dune Messiah almost feels like DLC for its predecessor, Dune. It’s not even half the length of the first book and the plot, set twelve years later, is focused on wrapping up storylines for certain characters and addressing the galaxy changing jihad that were so often alluded to. Mind you, this doesn’t make the book bad assuming you were interested enough in the world of Dune that you wanted to continue reading about it, which I obviously did. It just feels kind of like an afterward for the events of the first book, a relatively straightforward plot that ties up a few loose ends and prepares for a new generation of protagonists. It’s a quick return to Frank Herbert’s fascinating world and I’m sure I’ll continue onto the next book in future.

 

Currently Reading:

Sabriel by Garth Nix

Sabriel_Book_Cover

I’ve made my fiancée read many of my favorite books, so now I’m reading a few of hears. Sabriel is the first book in Garth Nix’s The Old Kingdom series. It’s a fantasy obviously, and while the book isn’t what I initially expected, I find its world and magic mechanics engrossing. I’m about halfway through, but I still feel like I’ve only scratched the surface of Nix’s world. Good thing I have two more books.

 

Currently Gaming:

The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild (Wii U)

It’s amazing, go play it.

Mass Effect: Andromeda (Xbox One)

If you loved the original games, go get this one.

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